Off With His Ear

November 17, 2010 at 3:25 pm 1 comment

Often when you think of someone losing an ear it is either Vincent Van Gogh chopping off his own or perhaps Mike Tyson biting off his opponent’s ear. Rarely do we think of  one of the apostles chopping someone’s ear off with a sword.

The scene is set in the Garden of Gethsemane. It is the night that Judas betrays the Savior. Judas leads  a band of men sent from the chief officials of the Jews. One of those men, is a servant of the high priest. As they draw near and prepare to take the Savior. Peter rushes forward, draws his sword and cuts off the servant’s ear(John 18:10, Matthew 26:51).

Jesus after having suffer for all the sins of humanity. Suffering so much he bled great drops of blood. After suffering all of this, he reaches forward and heals the servant’s ear(Luke 22:51). I think of that servant. He was sent to bring this man to be judged. And yet, that man healed him. Was he in awe? Was his heart changed? I don’t know. What I do know is that the Savior, despite all that he had just gone through, healed one of the men who came to take him.

If the Savior during his hours of agony could forgive and heal the man coming to take him to his death, can I do the same, but on a much smaller skill. My small and trivial pains compare nothing to the Savior’s. So in my small and insignificant sufferings I need to learn how to forgive others. Not only forgive, but to reach out and do my best to help them heal despite my own aches and pains.

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Entry filed under: Atonement, Hope.

To Jump Out of a Boat Three Times

1 Comment Add your own

  • 1. Elder Victor Moxley  |  November 20, 2010 at 11:34 am

    It would certainly be quite a trial to forgive someone taking you to your death. I wonder how much being able to forgive someone for that great a betrayal comes from building the capacity, maybe by forgiving people for smaller offenses, or how much comes from immediate personal integrity and desire to follow the spirit in the moment. Where do you think that capacity to forgive comes from?

    Reply

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